Monthly Archives: March 2018

Follow up to the last two meetings

Takeley Chapel

Last week we enjoyed the poem by Malcolm Guite: the Singing Bowl

And this week as we studied the Ten commandments, the question was asked whether we could kill to protect another.
As usual there was a lot of community wisdom and the following resource was mentioned.
Greg Boyd discusses the answer to the questions: “What if violence is necessary to protect a loved one and how we as Christians can respond in a Christ-like manner?” for the Reknew.org blog.

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Reflection for 11th February on transfiguration and the church.

Takeley Chapel

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God is the Lord of abundance, he forgives us freely and pours out his grace into creation. He himself comes to us and in Jesus takes creation into himself. Jesus becoming man, reveals that all things are spiritual, not in the sense of being sacred for us to worship, but in the sense that all things matter. Everything has its being in him and he becomes human. All things are held together in Christ and in him, from the beginning, there is an outpouring of grace and a call to love.
The begottenness of the Son is revealed in Jesus. What it is to be begotten of the Father from the beginning is made plain in the birth, death and resurrection of Jesus. He is the Christ. In his death and resurrection, we find life. This life is a life of love.
The fall of humanity in Adam was in…

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Reflection for Sunday 21st January 2018

Takeley Chapel

This morning’s readings focused on repentance and following after God. We saw how the disciples left their fishing nets to become fishers of people and how Jesus gave them a new identity in him (Mark 1). We also saw how even the most evil nation on earth was not beyond God’s salvation and how repentance changed God’s mind about their fate (Jonah 3),

The psalm reminded us that

Psalm 62:5
For God alone my soul waits in silence,
for my hope is from him.

But what of those with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease? What of those who acquire a neurological dysfunction or are born with one? How are they to respond? How are they to belong? Where does our theology reach them in an age where the solution appears to be to end life or not even allow it to start?

I believe our hope is in silent waiting, in…

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